e-book In Enemy Hands (Honor Harrington Book 7)

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Outnumbered, outgunned, and unable to run, she has just two options: There can be only one choice, and at least the People's Navy promises to treat their prisoners honorably. But the Navy is overruled by the political authorities, and Honor finds herself bound for a prison planet aptly named "Hell" Put into solitary confinement, separated from her officers and her treecat Nimitz, and subjected to systematic humiliation by her gaolers, Honor's future has become both bleak and short.

Yet bad as things look, they're about to get worse University of Washington University Bookstore. University of Wisconsin University Bookstore. Honor Harrington's career has its ups and its downs. Only registered users can write reviews. In Enemy Hands is a military science fiction novel by American writer David Weber , first published in It is the seventh book in the Honor Harrington series by.

Like most novels in the series, its text is available in the Baen Free Library. As the story begins, Honor returns to her Steading on Grayson, having just been promoted to Commodore for her actions in Honor Among Enemies. During a party celebrating her promotion, she engages in a heated debate with Earl White Haven, her superior, and the two realize they have mutual unspoken romantic feelings for each other. In an attempt to escape her own feelings, Honor goes with Alistair McKeon on a convoy escort mission to the Adler system, which has been captured by Citizen Rear Admiral Lester Tourville of the DuQuesne base, under the orders of Citizen Admiral Thomas Theisman , in order to capture or destroy a large chunk of Manticoran shipping.

Spotting the ambush and after salvaging what she can of her convoy from Havenite attack, Honor orders McKeon to surrender. After learning of Honor's capture Cordelia Ransom , the People's Republic 's Secretary for Public Information, who is present at Admiral Theismans' headquarters doing a propaganda piece, demands that the Manticorans be surrendered to her for propaganda uses. I found myself skipping lots of bloat, either excessive weapons descriptions or recaps of material already presented many times. Beside the story which I like, the best part of the Honor Harrington series is the randomness in which supporting cast characters are female or male.

A general, a judge or Review of the audio book. A general, a judge or a bully is as likely to be female as male. The narrator's use of accents is so-so. Don't read unless you have read all of the previous books in the series. Apr 19, Shaun Thomas rated it really liked it. Fittingly, this particular installment is more about Haven than Honor or Manticore. The first half of the book is almost purely setup, and considering the title, it's not exactly a surprise that our heroine is eventually captured. But that's fine in this context, because Haven has historically received the short end of the stick.

Haven's society is a precarious testament to unchecked power, the potency of directed propaganda, and delusions of grandeur. Weber paints a portrait of a society on the verge of another revolution, desperately scrabbling for scraps to maintain a war now required for public opinion. And yet the war is currently at a lull.

Sure, Haven captures a star system and transforms it into a dangerous lure, much to the chagrin of Honor and her squadron, but the political unrest threatens to revert this progress, and the Socialistic fervor of Cordelia Ransom certainly complicates matters. The point isn't that Honor is going to a prison planet, or even why this is the case, but that Haven's long obscured prison must be revealed, and all the implications involved when the Galaxy at large—including the Solarian League—discovers their duplicity.

It's clear this isn't just a war of military maneuvers, and that politics play a significant part, and the deeper insight that Weber introduces with his summary of Haven's social woes is impossible to ignore. Honor's involvement is a foregone conclusion, and the only real mystery is how she'll escape. Considering the length of the series at large, having a number of universe-building entries is necessary to maintain ambiance without it turning into a mere transcription of erratic space battles from the perspective of a somewhat empathetic heroine.

It's an interesting conundrum Weber has introduced this time, and I can't wait to see how it turns out. Jun 26, Guy rated it really liked it Shelves: As some of the other reviewers have said, this is not the strongest book in the Honor Harrington series although it is still very good. My reason for finding it somewhat heavy going is probably, however, idiosyncratic: I just don't like reading about suffering, particularly in the context of captivity and torture.

Not that torture is more than alluded to in the book -- we're nowhere close to the blood-soaked pages of Carey's "Kushiel's Legacy" series, or Mieville's "Perdido Street Station" -- As some of the other reviewers have said, this is not the strongest book in the Honor Harrington series although it is still very good.

Not that torture is more than alluded to in the book -- we're nowhere close to the blood-soaked pages of Carey's "Kushiel's Legacy" series, or Mieville's "Perdido Street Station" -- and the descriptions of suffering are also restrained unlike, for example, in Donaldson's "Thomas Covenant" books.

Nevertheless, there is more than enough to take away the pleasure of the space opera for me. Frankly, I've never understood the obviously widespread fascination with vicarious suffering widespread even if you leave aside those minorities who are either masochistic or sadistic. It seems to me that if you are going to imagine an experience, why not imagine a good one?

There are enough disappointments and unhappy times in real-life I see no need to add imagined woe to the total. This is a very long book, almost pages. The first half dragged for me with all the techno-babble on the configurations of the various classes of battleships and then all the discussions on battle strategies - I wish they were all put into appendices like the illustrations of the battleships! After skipping through most of the first half, the story only got interesting when Honor was actually In Enemy Hands.

But what came across was her people's devotion is almost slavish.

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And, as usual some of her closest and nearest willingly die for her! Even her fiercest opponents have such respect for her that they risk their own lives and careers for her!! I get that she's depicted as this inspirational leader and person but the sheer love she inspires just feels a bit over the top. And so we're left with a cliffhanger at the end and a brief look at the next book shows that it's got almost an extra pages on this one!!!

Mar 27, Cloak88 rated it liked it Shelves: Not my favorite, but still quite good. The book does much as the title implies. Things had to go wrong sometime and Honor loses and gets captured. Things get complicate with lots of politics and propaganda. Which is kind of what makes this a lesser book than the rest. The battles, fights and all the time spend with Honor is excellent, but there is way to much politics and to much time spent on people other than Honor herself. The series moves away just a bit to far from Honor personal story to th Not my favorite, but still quite good.

The series moves away just a bit to far from Honor personal story to the story of the war as a whole. In short not my favorite, but still better than most. Jan 16, Mandy Galileo rated it it was amazing. Riveting adventure, a true heroine and Weber is a great storyteller. Jan 03, Dan rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a really good book, but my least favorite story line of this series Still, 5 stars!

Nov 09, Richard Radgoski rated it really liked it Shelves: In Enemy Hands is the seventh book in the Honor Harrington series, and another audio book that I listened to with my son. We both really enjoy this series, even with its small flaws. While the casual reader could pick up the book and enjoy it without having read the previous, the emotional impact of certain scenes will be lessened without alrea In Enemy Hands is the seventh book in the Honor Harrington series, and another audio book that I listened to with my son.

In Enemy Hands

While the casual reader could pick up the book and enjoy it without having read the previous, the emotional impact of certain scenes will be lessened without already having gone through the first six books with many of these characters. This series is an odyssey - much akin to careers of Kent's fictional Richard Bolitho or real life naval personality - Horatio Nelson. So, given this, even though 'In Enemy Hands' does see Honor captured no surprise there , and its hard to generate true fear for a character who has many more books written about her after this one, what we come to fear is what happens to those around her.

These secondary characters, from her tree cat Nimitz, to her Guardsmen and staff, are important to those of us who have read from book 1. We've seen them 'grow up' and mature as characters and can remember when they did this our that. And unfortunately, they aren't the title character and aren't always protected. This novel puts you right there. The threat to many of her secondary characters is real - and the author makes the threat to Honor seem very real as well, despite what I've said above.

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Combined together, the sheer amount of tension in the last 3rd of this novel is palpable. I really enjoy this series and the authors handling of it - but he can be a bit verbose in his digressions.

Dr. Jerry Hendrix on Fleet Operations in the Honor Harrington series at NavyCon, part 11 of 13

A character can have a thought, which lasts for pages, before returning to a conversation. The actual pause is probably not more than a second, but pages pass as we digress into why that thought is valid. One the one hand, this is interesting and needed I think these books would be harder to get through reading than listening She does an outstanding job of reading the novels and bringing to life the characters as we follow them along.

The next novel takes place immediately after this one and truly should be read after this one 4 solid stars Feb 13, Sean rated it it was ok. I really do want to stick with the Honor Harrington series through all of the books.


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But Weber makes this harder and harder, since each book seems to have less and less action. Or maybe I'm just growing more and more weary of the long dialogues between political characters about political situations. Or maybe it's the long drawn out descriptions of engineering details that Weber has dreamt up about something.

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I love that he's taken the time to figure out how things work and made it all believabl I really do want to stick with the Honor Harrington series through all of the books. I love that he's taken the time to figure out how things work and made it all believable. But it's just outrageously boring to have to sit through pages and pages of having one character explain it all to another. Having said all of that, Weber did finally come through at the end of book 7 with some action.

His ship-to-ship action is also getting a bit stale, so this time it was thankfully something a bit different. I did enjoy that something finally happened in this book. I think that this is my favorite book in the Honor Harrington series so far. It started off a little slow and then included everything that I like in a Harrington book.

It had space combat scenes with lots of explosions and tactical wizardry. One of the aspects of the book that I really enjoyed was the focus on characters in the People's Republic of Haven Navy, or the "bad guys". The Peep as they are called in the b I think that this is my favorite book in the Honor Harrington series so far. The Peep as they are called in the books naval officers are warriors trying to do their job while having to navigate the Kafkaseque political situation of their space empire.